Fraser Island, listed as one of the prized World Heritage sites in Australia, boasts an amazing network of freshwater lakes that is half the number of the identified perched lakes in the world. Many adventurers and travellers flock to Fraser’s remarkable water spots to camp or enjoy a picnic, swim, or simply to marvel at the awe-inspiring beauty. One of the natural attractions on Fraser Island that continues to invite travellers is Lake Wabby.

Learn why you should take a trip to one of Fraser Island’s breathtaking sites now with these five fascinating facts:

1. Lake Wabby is the deepest lake on Fraser Island

“Of the 40 perched dune lakes on Fraser Island, Lake Wabby is the deepest at 11.4 metres,” according to QueenslandAustralia.com. The Department of National Parks, Recreation, Sports and Racing, however, advises against diving, jumping or swimming in the lake as serious injuries have occurred.

2. A number of fish species thrive in the lake

Unlike Lake McKenzie and the other Fraser Island lakes which contain high acidity levels, Lake Wabby’s is fairly low, allowing it to house most aquatic life. Several species of fish that live in the lake include the catfish and rainbow fish, and the rare honey blue-eye. So don’t be surprised if something brushes or tickles your leg when exploring the lake.

3. Lake Wabby is both a window lake and a barrage lake

Lake Wabby is popular among tourists, being a unique body of water – it is the only barrage lake on Fraser Island and is also a window lake. A barrage lake is formed “when the wind carries sand across the island, the sand forms a bank that then dams an already existing creek or stream forming what is known in Australia as a billabong.” Window lakes, on the other hand, are formed by “a natural depression or valley in the sand exposing the water table.”

4. It has a historic significance to the Butchulla people and the inhabitants of the area

Taking a trip to Lake Wabby also means that you become a part of the rich history of the area. Lake Wabby is an area of high significance to the traditional Butchella poeople and was a mens only area.

5. In a hundred years or so, Lake Wabby will be gone

Lake Wabby is ever changing. Experts advise tourists to enjoy the beauty of Lake Wabby while it lasts, since a hundred years from now one of Fraser Island’s jewels may be no more. Being a barrage lake, the giant sand dune that borders Lake Wabby’s emerald green waters will eventually move into the lake and occupy its waters. In a century or so, the sand dune’s inexorable march westward across Fraser Island will see it completely swallow the lake. Hammerstone sand blow advances at the rate of around 1 metres a year and will eventually swallow the lake.

Among Fraser Island lakes, Lake Wabby is truly one of its kind. Don’t miss the opportunity of witnessing and exploring its rich wildlife, fresh green waters, fine, delicate sand dunes, and colourful history while you still can by booking a tour with us at Drop Bear Adventures. Our popular Fraser Island camping tours include a trip to Lake Wabby and the rest of Fraser Island’s attractions, such as Lake McKenzie, Indian Head, Champagne Pools and more. Please contact us today and speak to our friendly team.